Green Envy

“Green Envy” is the successor of KillaJoule. It will be built with the goal to be the world’s fastest motorcycle, period.

We are changing color – from red to green! After 7 years on the race track, the KillaJoule is due for retirement. It is simply too slow and too old. Its successor the “Green Envy” will be built in 2018 and raced in 2019.

“Green Envy” is the successor of KillaJoule. It will be a battery-powered, streamliner, sidecar motorcycle and it will look very much like the KillaJoule. However, there will be some major differences. First off, Green Envy will – of course – be green instead of red. It will also have more than twice the power, the target is around 1000 horsepower (HP). It will be built with the goal to be the world’s fastest motorcycle, period*. In order to fit the larger drivetrain, the Green Envy will be about 3 ft (1 m ) longer than the KillaJoule, which means about 23 ft or 7 m. The cross-sectional area will stay the same, and the aerodynamics will be improved. There will also be a lot of subtle changes improving performance, handling, and reliability. Or simply speaking, we will learn from all the mistakes we made building the KillaJoule. 😉

The Green Envy will be constructed in New Zealand, and will be raced at the salt flats in Australia in 2019. The reason it won’t be built in the USA like KillaJoule, is that I will be teaching engineering design at the University of Auckland, New Zealand in 2018 and 2019. Because the Green Envy will be built by me and Bill, it will be built where we are, which will be New Zealand.

The Green Envy is currently in an advanced design phase and the different component choices are being locked in. (If you are a prospective sponsor – this is your chance before someone else beats you to it! Next year it might be too late! Contact me for more info). The preliminary data is below. The physical construction will start as soon as we arrive in New Zealand, which will be December 2017.

* As of July 2017, the overall motorcycle record is 376 mph, held by Ack Attack and Rocky Robinson.

Preliminary data, Green Envy:

DRIVETRAIN:

Power: 1000 HP or more (minimum acceptable 800 HP). [2-3 times the KillaJoule]

Motors: AC. Maximum 2 motors and 2 controllers. Maximum practical diameter ~500 mm, maximum practical length ~320 mm. Range of maximum RPM allowing for single reduction final drive: 3000 to 12,000 RPM. (At 400 mph, the wheel rpm is ~5000). Currently looking for a motor partner.

Battery voltage: ~400 V preferred [Same as the KillaJoule].

Battery capacity: 15-25 kWh (re-using the battery pack from the KillaJoule would give 20 kWh)

Battery chemistry: Lithium-ion-iron-phosphate very much preferred. [Same as the KillaJoule]

CHASSIS:

Frame: Chrome-moly steel tubes, TIG welded. [Same as the KillaJoule]

Bodywork: Combination of aluminum sheet metal (for single curved surfaces) and 3D printed and/or composite parts (for complex curved surfaces). [Similar to the KillaJoule, but more 3D printed parts expected].

Wheels: Non-pnematic wheels, currently under development. Goodyear pneumatic LSR tires as Plan B. [KillaJoule’s wheels will be used as Plan B if the wheel development is unsuccessful].

Front suspension: Springer-style front suspension. [Same as KillaJoule]. Currently looking for a suspension partner.

Steering: Side-sticks connected to the springer-style fork. [Same as KillaJoule].

Rear suspension: Stereo suspension.

PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS:

Length: ~7 m (23 ft). [1 m / 3-4 ft longer than the KillaJoule]

Height: ~1 m (~40 inches) [Similar to the KillaJoule]

Width: ~0.5 m (20 inches) [Same as the KillaJoule]

Weight: Target is to stay under 1000 kg (2200 lbs). [Up to 50 % more than the KillaJoule due to the larger drivetrain].

Timeline:

2017: Design phase, locking in components and design features.

2018: Construction, in Auckland, New Zealand.

March 2019: First start at Lake Gairdner salt flats, South Australia, Australia under the sanctioning of the Dry Lake Racers of Australia. The goal is to make a safe, successful run and keep the rubber side down and the shiny side up. A speed of 200+ mph would be considered a success. Anything higher than that would just be bonus!

August 2019: If time and budget allows, it would be possible to race the Green Envy at Bonneville as well, but that would require very generous sponsors.

March 2010: Back at Lake Gairdner salt flats, Australia. Target: 300+ mph, perhaps even 400+ mph if the planets line up and the angels are singing. (Yes, everything has to work perfectly for this to happen, that’s why it takes so long to prepare).

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